Category Archives: Interior Design

The Journey Back to Black: The Nuances of Dark Walls

This gallery contains 9 photos.

There is something undeniably glamorous about a minimalist stance — the balancing act of reduction; the idea of “less is more”. But to eclipse color and blanket everything with black holds a magic of its own.   Currently, I am experiencing … Continue reading

Top 10 Tricks the Pros Use When Choosing Paint Color:

It’s always fun to pop into the paint store and check out the latest color trends, imaging the magical transformation a new paint color creates. There is no other tool in the designer’s kit that brings a bigger bang for the design buck than fresh paint.

There’s nothing worse than a near-miss when it comes to color. Sure, the all-out color disaster would qualify, but how often does that happen with paint? Not nearly as often as those near-misses. We see them often.

To keep you from heading towards disaster, keep the following tips in minds as you dream of stunning new color…

When choosing paint color, always try before you buy


Top 10 Tricks the Pros Use When Choosing Color:

  1. Do not choose your color in the paint store without taking it home for a test run.

  2. Pick up a wet paint sample and a mini roller (foam brushes don’t lay enough paint for an accurate color reading).

  3. Paint a minimum sample size on your wall that’s at least 24” x 24”. Bigger is always better.

  4. Test your color in three areas: in the corner, the wall opposite the largest window and the window wall itself (this way you can see the color on the lightest wall, darkest wall, while the corner will show you the most intensified color).

  5. The best time of day to choose colors is between 10am to 2pm – when the sun is highest in the sky.

  6. Take step #5 to heart, but make sure to analyze your color with your morning coffee and with your evening cocktails. Your color will look different during each time of day.

  7. Color is all about relationships. When it comes to choosing paint, make sure you have assembled all the important elements that will be in the room; sofa, carpet and tile, cabinetry, etc. The color of your paint is a lot easier to adjust than anything else in a design scheme (and even easier if you haven’t painted yet!)

  8. When comparing more than one color, make sure you can view your samples individually, otherwise the different colors will influence each other.

  9. Consider using a color professional. This is what they do, and you can save a lot of time and effort by heading in the right direction from the beginning.

  10. Give yourself enough time to find your perfect color. Taking your time minimizes the stress of making the ‘right’ decision, and you can make sure you’ve got it nailed down before the painter gets rolling!

Consider hiring a professional color expert. Here, interior designer Paula McHugh is working with Daly’s Dan Cookston.



The Bravery of Colour by Philippa Radon

Embarking on a new design project early in the year personally gives me great joy. The feel of a new project ignites my creativity. Winter is a time to gather in, collect ideas, resource, research and immerse oneself into something artistic and creative. What follows the intention of change is a wonderful journey of self discovery, creation and self expression.

Cool colors create a sense of calm

Yet, for most of us, despite the plethora of advertisements, TV shows and glossy magazine spreads highlighting well staged and colourful visuals – the annual broadcasting of new colour trends and palettes, still leads many into a panic. Though we should not necessarily feel compelled to repaint and design as frequently as we change our seasonal wardrobe, home is the environment for our self expression. A building portfolio of personal investment that allows us the freedom to surround ourselves in this very high tech world, with tactile comfort and beauty.

“A little color bravery invigorates a space”

The presented trend focus for 2017 appears to highlight three lifestyle curated groupings, and is intended to streamline the overwhelming choices: Composed, Confident and Comfortable. Or perhaps, if this forecast does not resonate with us entirely it might only expand our tendency to feed any lack of confidence we have on our own decision-making abilities.

Introducing something new, bold and beautiful with a diverse colour scheme does take an immense leap of faith and a boatload of courage, if on one’s own. As a consultant, my role is to broaden your perspective and enable you to see the familiar in a new way. To guide you, so you have a greater sense of what you are looking for in order to know when you have found it.

I have created a few professional prompts to help navigate and inspire you into achieving successful and rewarding results.

7 STEPS to Colour Confidence:

1. Colour equates atmosphere. It’s the most important thing in the room, infusing our surroundings with emotion and vitality. Rethinking our colour choices and breaking habits of familiar ‘go to’ colours is empowering. Most people are afraid of colour until they see the beauty of it on their walls, you just have to take the steps to achieve that. Don’t we all strive to surround ourselves with colours and objects that resonate with our soul – nurture and support our well being in the most positive manner. Colours in particular often evoke reactions that are more psychological than practical, and that is part of the magic that allows you to create an atmosphere that will enable you to feel intrinsically at home.

2. Visualize and Feel the Space. Visualization brings your ideas to life, and allows you to start at the end and work outwards to simply frame and envision the goals you are striving for. So, grab a notebook and cup of tea, sit in the space, clear out clutter, scrutinize and determine the details and character of the room. Visualize and see all the new possibilities for something different; don’t settle for less than your vision.

My design philosophy: Make it Your Own.

3.  Determine the purpose and function of the room before even attempting to view color is key. The functionality will often determine the mood one wants to create. We are striving to create a space that looks right and feels right.

4.  Trust your own intuitive voice. Jot down everything that comes to mind. Brainstorm your ideas as a map, not a list, with no order of hierarchy. This more holistic and intuitive approach contributes to creating a space that will inspire and benefit you when you call it home.

5. Get Inspired! Now you have your own personal established foundation about the room details to work from start to resource and research. This means getting out and exploring, not just looking online. Color stems from two arena’s:  art and nature — so spend time looking at nature, museums, books, movie sets, fashion, make up counters, magazines, product labels. Try and observe color and co-ordinating colors, in a new way. This should be fun!

6. Create a storyboard. Remember, we all imitate before we innovate! Paste your ideas and findings into a book — collate and gather all you can. Make the most of all the new data that’s out there and select what resonates most with you. Discern and select your main colour group first, then narrow it down to the right shade. Then think about your partnering colours and the relationships.

My storyboards combine inspiration from nature, textiles and more…

7. Paint Away Problems. Downplay built-ins by painting them the same colour as the walls. Refresh a worn wood floor with an invigorating coat of paint. Enlarge a small space by limiting the palette to shades of just one colour. Don’t be afraid of going dark — a deep hue can transform a room into a magical space. Brighten a dark colour with a sheen finish. Treat ceilings as unexpected terrain with anything but white.

Colour has many more attributes than merely creating an appealing palette. It holds many mysterious qualities, and provides the emotional expression of the space it inhabits. Embarking on a new project, we often take on more work than anticipated, but perhaps with these beginning guide lines and a new approach and self awareness, it will help you to create a home that has balance, harmony and style. So that you can love the colours you live with and make it your own, with a little colour bravery.

About Philippa:

C2 Colour Consultant & Designer

Philippa Radon cultivated her signature colour-based design philosophy through many years of developing her professionally trained eye in the industry. Working with high profile British and U.S. designers, her work as a colour consultant led her to establishing her own full service design firm servicing national and international clientele alike.

Her love of luxurious colour and livable interiors began at a young age. Coming from a curious mix of British aristocrats and artists, and surrounded by painters, writers and politicians, her creative energy and visual hunger was stirred early on. Her extensive travels and time spent living throughout Europe honed her interest in arts and architecture, which naturally progressed into a love of design.

During the span of her colour consulting, fine arts and interior design career, Philippa has established paint lines for Pottery Barn, developed her own organic paint line, and worked on projects for the Victoria and Albert Museum, British National Trust and St. James Palace. Her commercial clients have included Guess Clothing, Ralph Lauren clothing stores, the Pacific Design Center in Los Angeles, Steven Ehrlich, St. John’s Hospital in Los Angeles, William Morris Agency and Maxxam Enterprises. Her residential clients are a diverse group including Warner Brothers VIP John Richards, Benenson Capital in New York, and the artist formerly known as Prince.

Learn more about her at: http://philipparadondesign.com

 



HOW MOOD AND COLOR INFLUENCE DESIGN

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How moody are you? What is your color story? One might ask these questions when approaching an interior design project. The presence, or absence of color is in our daily lives — from the moment the sun rises, casting its tone and mood on the day, to the clothes we wear, to the spaces we live in. Light and color are synonymous. Looking inward to the space we live in, specific hues can provoke different emotions, associations, and responses that affect how one’s home is perceived. In fact, some research has shown that color can increase mood up to 80%.

Let Color Choices Dictate Design Plans. Color choices can make or break a design. Fortunately, we are far from the times when our color choices were limited to a small batch of natural pigments. Synthetic pigments and the screen have made our lives increasingly easier, while also making decisions infinitely more complex.

Full spectrum paint creates a dynamic, luminous effect

Full spectrum paint creates a dynamic, luminous effect

Faced with such an overwhelming amount of color options in today’s markets, many homeowners profess to be afraid of color, for fear of making mistakes.  Consulting with an interior designer when selecting a color palette for a design project is an integral part of the process.

How Mood and Color Create Your Story.  When telling a client’s color story, I always start with getting to know their personality and lifestyle. A color story should reflect various elements of a personality to avoid looking like a theme, so it has always been important to me to add a mixture of light and dark.

Each room tells a story

Each room tells a story

A rich color story should also be offer flexibility and adaptation – I decorate for all seasons and moods. Purely as a personal preference, the complexity of moods is what I am drawn to, love and relate to. I probably wouldn’t be happy in a totally light, airy home; my nature and personality requires a moody house so much so that a light and cheery environment, for me, would feel as if it was missing some depth, richness and contrast.

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Darker colors create a sense of richness and depth

While I typically have a mix of light and dark all in one room, I also find it creatively interesting to experience various moods as I wander through the house. The “moodiness” of a room doesn’t have to come only from colored or dark walls, of course, it can also be achieved through layers, darker floors, a mix of richer furniture, antiques, fabrics, or painted cabinets—all combined to reflect a mood and tell a story.

A color story should reflect various elements of a personality to avoid looking like a theme.

At times, the actual space also dictates the setting of a mood. Moody rooms might feel more appropriate with certain styles or even locations and settings of a house. Case in point, when a space has a lot of natural light at the back of a house, dark wall colors would feel washed out, so a lighter color and tone and mood works best in those rooms.

Play off the natural light

Play off the natural light

For me, I feel best when the mood of a home feels inspired by and incorporates aspects of the mood of the natural habitat we live in. I tend to feel more comfortable with colors that have slightly warmer or gray undertones. Selecting colors that reflect and arouse a sense of cohesiveness inside and out feels more settling and comforting to me. So, don’t be afraid of being moody. Use it to tell your personal color story.


About Designer, David Chenault

David Chenault

David Anthony Chenault

These words have been used by clients and peers to describe the designer who is David Anthony Chenault. Born in Denver, Colorado and raised in Missouri, David Anthony Chenault had a creative eye and a penchant for making things beautiful since early childhood. He was simply born and destined to be a designer. He went on to graduate with a degree in Architecture with an emphasis in Interior Design from Southwest Missouri State University.

Over the course of 28 years, David has since transformed many homes in the tri-state area, as well as designed memorable residential and commercial projects across the country. As the principal interior designer for David Anthony Chenault Interior Design, David creates fresh, timeless spaces that are beautiful, elegant, and unforgettable. The design is a collaboration of his own vision and that of identifying the dream that is within the client’s desires. The style of his work is traditional with a modern approach. “We want our homes to reflect the client’s lifestyle, not a fancy trend,” he says. “Homes should emanate personality and warmth, and be comfortable and livable while retaining a certain formality.” David’s work has been published in Christie’s Great Estates, Home & Design, Washingtonian, Northern Virginia, Architectural Digest and 417. Regularly featured in Houzz.com, currently, Home and Design “PORTFOLIO” has also added David as one of the Tri states’ Top 100 Designers.

Contact David at http://www.davidanthonychenault.com

 

 

 

 

 

 



Perfect 10 with Interior Designer Barry Dixon

Interior Designer Barry Dixon

Interior Designer & Visionary Barry Dixon

Virginia-based interior designer and quintessential Southern Gentleman, Barry Dixon, talks about his personal and professional inspirations and the trends he sees for the upcoming year.

1. When did you first recognize your love for design?
As a child in the second grade realizing that I was unreasonably upset when my mother made appointments with her interior designer, Miss Pate, while I was a way at school. I felt I needed to be at those meetings!

2. Where do you currently find your design inspiration?
Via the pantheon of design successes in the history of aesthetics…and in the ever-inspiring natural world around me.

3. How would you describe your personal design aesthetic?
A complex layering of favorite things. In the best instances, timeless.
(more…)

4. Your designs are so thoughtful, with a real focus on the details. How can the DIY designer bring that professional aesthetic into their home? 
By using details to avoid sameness in design. Our homes should reflect us, and not look like everyone else’s!

5. Each homeowner has a different style; how do you make sure that you capture their personality?
Listening. And watching! what lights up their eyes? What colors make them glow? Every designer needs to understand the psychology of color, and how this applies to each individual. We’re all different in the end.

6. What trends are you seeing this year?
PATTERN WISE – Larger scale prints and patterns.
COLOR WISE – Bold or muted, fewer “in-between” tones.
FINISH WISE – Lots more lacquer. People are loving a “high gloss” shine.

7. There are so many details to manage in large design projects. Do you set aside a specific time to dedicate to the creative process? What does that process look like? 
It hits when it hits…often when you’re not distracted by myriad interruptions. For me, usually late at night or early in the morning. Or in the shower! Or on a long drive or flight.

8. In what environment do you feel most creative?
At home in my creative “lair” – my atelier in the attic levels of Elway Hall.

9. Aside from design, what else inspires you?
Well, nature, of course, and film, especially old, silver screen classics with delicious, stylish sets. Books. Art. And fashion! A retrospective such as the Met’s  “Alexander McQueen Savage Beauty” or “China: Through the Looking Glass” can stay with me for years!

10. Describe someone outside your field of interest who inspires you and why?
Mahatma Gandhi, Kahlil Gibran – they make us think.
Lucille Ball, Carol Burnett, Cary Grant – they make us laugh.
Alexander McQueen, Mark Rothko, Walt Disney – they make us dream.

11. You are a seasoned traveler. Where have you not been that you would like to visit?
The farthest cliffs of Nepal.

12. Who would play you in your feature film biopic?
If I could go back in time, I’d choose Gregory Peck. Or Gary Cooper!

13. If you were given the opportunity to create a reality-type design TV show, what would it look like?
One where the designer would help people find their own, completely unique design style. A more soulful approach to design.