HOW MOOD AND COLOR INFLUENCE DESIGN

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How moody are you? What is your color story? One might ask these questions when approaching an interior design project. The presence, or absence of color is in our daily lives — from the moment the sun rises, casting its tone and mood on the day, to the clothes we wear, to the spaces we live in. Light and color are synonymous. Looking inward to the space we live in, specific hues can provoke different emotions, associations, and responses that affect how one’s home is perceived. In fact, some research has shown that color can increase mood up to 80%.

Let Color Choices Dictate Design Plans. Color choices can make or break a design. Fortunately, we are far from the times when our color choices were limited to a small batch of natural pigments. Synthetic pigments and the screen have made our lives increasingly easier, while also making decisions infinitely more complex.

Full spectrum paint creates a dynamic, luminous effect

Full spectrum paint creates a dynamic, luminous effect

Faced with such an overwhelming amount of color options in today’s markets, many homeowners profess to be afraid of color, for fear of making mistakes.  Consulting with an interior designer when selecting a color palette for a design project is an integral part of the process.

How Mood and Color Create Your Story.  When telling a client’s color story, I always start with getting to know their personality and lifestyle. A color story should reflect various elements of a personality to avoid looking like a theme, so it has always been important to me to add a mixture of light and dark.

Each room tells a story

Each room tells a story

A rich color story should also be offer flexibility and adaptation – I decorate for all seasons and moods. Purely as a personal preference, the complexity of moods is what I am drawn to, love and relate to. I probably wouldn’t be happy in a totally light, airy home; my nature and personality requires a moody house so much so that a light and cheery environment, for me, would feel as if it was missing some depth, richness and contrast.

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Darker colors create a sense of richness and depth

While I typically have a mix of light and dark all in one room, I also find it creatively interesting to experience various moods as I wander through the house. The “moodiness” of a room doesn’t have to come only from colored or dark walls, of course, it can also be achieved through layers, darker floors, a mix of richer furniture, antiques, fabrics, or painted cabinets—all combined to reflect a mood and tell a story.

A color story should reflect various elements of a personality to avoid looking like a theme.

At times, the actual space also dictates the setting of a mood. Moody rooms might feel more appropriate with certain styles or even locations and settings of a house. Case in point, when a space has a lot of natural light at the back of a house, dark wall colors would feel washed out, so a lighter color and tone and mood works best in those rooms.

Play off the natural light

Play off the natural light

For me, I feel best when the mood of a home feels inspired by and incorporates aspects of the mood of the natural habitat we live in. I tend to feel more comfortable with colors that have slightly warmer or gray undertones. Selecting colors that reflect and arouse a sense of cohesiveness inside and out feels more settling and comforting to me. So, don’t be afraid of being moody. Use it to tell your personal color story.


About Designer, David Chenault

David Chenault

David Anthony Chenault

These words have been used by clients and peers to describe the designer who is David Anthony Chenault. Born in Denver, Colorado and raised in Missouri, David Anthony Chenault had a creative eye and a penchant for making things beautiful since early childhood. He was simply born and destined to be a designer. He went on to graduate with a degree in Architecture with an emphasis in Interior Design from Southwest Missouri State University.

Over the course of 28 years, David has since transformed many homes in the tri-state area, as well as designed memorable residential and commercial projects across the country. As the principal interior designer for David Anthony Chenault Interior Design, David creates fresh, timeless spaces that are beautiful, elegant, and unforgettable. The design is a collaboration of his own vision and that of identifying the dream that is within the client’s desires. The style of his work is traditional with a modern approach. “We want our homes to reflect the client’s lifestyle, not a fancy trend,” he says. “Homes should emanate personality and warmth, and be comfortable and livable while retaining a certain formality.” David’s work has been published in Christie’s Great Estates, Home & Design, Washingtonian, Northern Virginia, Architectural Digest and 417. Regularly featured in Houzz.com, currently, Home and Design “PORTFOLIO” has also added David as one of the Tri states’ Top 100 Designers.

Contact David at http://www.davidanthonychenault.com

 

 

 

 

 

 



How Color Effects Mood

Did you ever walk into a room and feel instantly calm? Often times it’s more than Yanni on repeat that generates that sense of calm. Much of that feeling is attributed to the paint color they chose, and more specifically the undertone of the paint color they chose.

When discussing paint color, we usually think of how the shade will look in a particular room. Did you know that color can also affect the way we feel? The philosophy of color explains how color is directly tied to our emotions. Everyone understands what it means to be “red with anger”, “green with envy”, or what it is to “feel the blues”. When it comes to color for your home, you can control how your home ‘feels’ by the artful – and strategic – use of color.

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Color is connected to the light spectrum, and therefore affects our bodies physically, even when our eyes are closed. For example, you could walk into a freshly painted white room and feel how cold it is, but enter a different white room and it might feel fresh and lively instead. Much of this is accomplished by the undertones and formulation of the color itself. That’s why full-spectrum paints are so compelling.

Full-spectrum paints, like every color in the C2 Paint palette, are formulated using multiple pigments that represent more of the color wheel than traditional paint formulas. Additionally, no C2 Paint color uses any black pigment in their color recipes, so you never have a color that looks lifeless or dull. The beauty of full-spectrum colors is that regardless of the current light condition, the paint color interacts with light in a compelling, luminous way.

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Beautiful full spectrum colorants

Combining full-spectrum paints and armed with a little knowledge about specific colors and how they make you feel, you can create an environment that really makes you feel good. Really good.

Here is a brief explanation of each color and how it affects you:

Yellow – It’s virtually impossible to be cranky in a yellow room. Using yellow, anything from palest creams to deepest golds, is like capturing the sun in a jar. Yellow is an energetic color, so use it where you want to bump up the joy.

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Lightening Bug, BD-71

Orange – If you’re looking to stimulate the appetite and add spice, orange is the perfect choice. It also symbolizes change when it’s bright and lively, and represents stability when muted and quiet. In design, energetic orange is a great color to excitement to a neutral space.

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Bittervine, BD-45

Red – Ready to romp? Yup, forget those 50 Shades and use red instead. Red raises your heart rate and time passes in a blur. Take it a little more orange and it’s the perfect color to increase your appetite.

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c2_tango_C2-566 Plum Tomato, BD-62

Purple – Interestingly, purple is a combination of hot to-trot-red and cooler-than-cool blue, so it brings both elements to the table. Purple can make your feel very meditative and intellectual or vivacious and royal.

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Tamarind, C2-505

Blue – One of  the most popular and reassuring color used in design, blue communicates stability and safety, as evidenced on this chic office wall.

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Espionage, C2-742; Whistler White (ceiling, walls, trim), C2-756

Green  If you want to create a soothing sense of calm, green is your hue. Soft colors, like green sea glass all the way to rich, deep emeralds and olives; green is a great choice.

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Posh, C2-934



Full Spectrum Paint Color – What’s all the Fuss About?

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For the past decade or so the concept of full spectrum paint color has emerged as one of the most intriguing developments in paint color technology. This emergence has been met with rave reviews and accolades by some, while others have not been able to grasp what all the fuss is about.

From a purely objective perspective what is implied by full spectrum color is that each color regardless of its apparent hue is comprised of a multiple of different colorants (color pigments), incorporating a little something from all of the different places on the traditional color wheel. Black colorant is always eliminated from this approach due to its inherent non-reflectivity. So reds will also have blues and yellows added, and the deepest of hues that may look black, will actually be a concoction of colorants with everything except black! It is important to understand why this approach is different from the industry standard that we have lived with since post World War II. Continue reading

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Traditionally paint companies have manufactured colors with as few colorants as possible. Some of the reasons for doing this made sense at the time. Back in the day when all paint was manually tinted by a store clerk, this approach made the process simpler and resulted in less mis-tinted paint. Having to dispense two or three colorants to achieve a color is by definition easier than tinting one that requires in some cases up to eight or more colorants.

Another good reason for this approach was that all of the color chips that were produced to represent the colors of any given palette were made from lacquerer or ink, not paint (who knew?). A simpler formula was a better way to achieve an acceptable match between the actual paint being purchased and the chip that was used as a reference. As we all know this doesn’t always work out in the end either. Furthermore the lacquerers used are tinted with different colorants than those used to tint the paint you purchase. You can see how this can present a problem.

The good news is that modern technologies have allowed us to overcome these limitations. Almost all paint stores employ computerized dispensing equipment that allows for the accurate and repeatable dispensing of complex formulas with any combination of colorants we choose. This virtually eliminates the chances of the formula being dispensed incorrectly.

With regard to the paint chips, few manufacturers are willing to make paint chips from real paint. C2 Paint is one exception to this rule. All of the C2 color tools, (Ultimate Paint Chips, fan decks, or Take Home Chips) are made from real eggshell paint and the actual colorants that are used in tinting the paint that you ultimately put on your walls. C2 color tools have the ability to represent complex full spectrum colors accurately because they are made from real paint using the same colorants and combinations that are used in the paint you buy.

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Another compelling reason for paint manufacturers to not embrace the full spectrum approach is cost. It is much cheaper to use black and a few other less expensive colorants than it is to create full spectrum colors that employ more expensive colorants in greater quantities. C2 Paint has always taken the approach of bringing to market the most beautiful and high quality colors, regardless of cost.

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So now that we can do it, why do we want to do it? Or better yet why should you purchase full spectrum paint over the more traditional and widely available options? One analogy that I like to use to illustrate the difference is that of a well cooked dish that is made with a variety of different spices in varying amounts, compared to one using basic salt and pepper. If prepared right, you may not be fully aware of exactly what you taste, but you know it tastes great. Similarly the nuances and undertones of a full spectrum color make it inherently more satisfying to the eye than its salt and pepper counterparts.

Furthermore this multiple colorant approach reflects a fuller range of natural light, allowing the paint colors to easily blend with the other design elements in a given room. Fabrics, carpets, and accessories are more harmonious when pulled together by a paint color that has elements of all of their colors present. Run of the mill paint colors are much harder to match with other specific elements due to the narrower range of light that they reflect. In simple terms full spectrum colors play well with others.

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Fine artists have employed this technique for centuries. Using complementary colors to de-chromatize the primary colors of red, blue, and yellow, instead of black, has allowed artists to more accurately capture the nuances of natural light in their paintings. Rembrandt was known to instruct his apprentices to use a full spectrum gray ground on all their canvases before they began painting. With full spectrum paint colors you are able to apply this same fine art technique to your walls.

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The C2 palette of 496 full spectrum colors provides the advantage of being a pre-edited collection that offers only the most beautiful colors that have been time tested and proven to work well in the real world.

In summary full spectrum paint colors are superior to their more commercially available alternatives because they reflect a broader range of natural light and are easier to coordinate with the other three dimensional elements in the room. More beauty with less stress sounds like a winning combination to me.

 

Philip Reno brings his deeply experienced perspective to the world of color design. Having spent the first eighteen years of his career as a master painter, faux finisher, and color consultant, he accumulated first-hand experience and observed the intricacies of paint color. He owned operated G&R Paint Company, San Francisco’s premier retail color and paint destination, for 18 years and is now a consultant to The Coatings Alliance, the manufacturers of C2 Paint.



C2 Paint Fall 2016 Color Trends

While still popular, the softer tones that headlined seasons past are moving toward more adventurous colors in deep and mid tones. Reflective of a strong desire for confidence and stability, blues are the lead trend for fall 2016 – ranging from light, milky tones to more robust, stately hues. We anticipate one of the most popular being deep, near black blues (like Espionage, C2-742 and Brigand, C2-757). Other more vibrant colors like emerald greens, green-based yellows and purples are also becoming more popular, while earth tones remain a steady favorite.

Watch the video of our fall C2 colors below!

 

Another current trend that is growing is the “finish of the moment”  – gloss. Using this beautifully reflective sheen with deep tones on walls results in a high fashion, high design feel. It’s also being used more regularly on ceilings to create polish, interest and a touch of glamour.

High Gloss Ceiling Using C2 Cousteau (C2-713)

High Gloss Ceiling Using C2 Cousteau (C2-713)

High gloss ceilings add a touch of polish and glam. Featuring C2-Drabware (BD-4)

High gloss ceilings add a touch of polish and glam. Featuring Drabware (BD-4)

Tell us what color and design trends are inspiring you this season!

 



Perfect 10 with Interior Designer Barry Dixon

Interior Designer Barry Dixon

Interior Designer & Visionary Barry Dixon

Virginia-based interior designer and quintessential Southern Gentleman, Barry Dixon, talks about his personal and professional inspirations and the trends he sees for the upcoming year.

1. When did you first recognize your love for design?
As a child in the second grade realizing that I was unreasonably upset when my mother made appointments with her interior designer, Miss Pate, while I was a way at school. I felt I needed to be at those meetings!

2. Where do you currently find your design inspiration?
Via the pantheon of design successes in the history of aesthetics…and in the ever-inspiring natural world around me.

3. How would you describe your personal design aesthetic?
A complex layering of favorite things. In the best instances, timeless.
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4. Your designs are so thoughtful, with a real focus on the details. How can the DIY designer bring that professional aesthetic into their home? 
By using details to avoid sameness in design. Our homes should reflect us, and not look like everyone else’s!

5. Each homeowner has a different style; how do you make sure that you capture their personality?
Listening. And watching! what lights up their eyes? What colors make them glow? Every designer needs to understand the psychology of color, and how this applies to each individual. We’re all different in the end.

6. What trends are you seeing this year?
PATTERN WISE – Larger scale prints and patterns.
COLOR WISE – Bold or muted, fewer “in-between” tones.
FINISH WISE – Lots more lacquer. People are loving a “high gloss” shine.

7. There are so many details to manage in large design projects. Do you set aside a specific time to dedicate to the creative process? What does that process look like? 
It hits when it hits…often when you’re not distracted by myriad interruptions. For me, usually late at night or early in the morning. Or in the shower! Or on a long drive or flight.

8. In what environment do you feel most creative?
At home in my creative “lair” – my atelier in the attic levels of Elway Hall.

9. Aside from design, what else inspires you?
Well, nature, of course, and film, especially old, silver screen classics with delicious, stylish sets. Books. Art. And fashion! A retrospective such as the Met’s  “Alexander McQueen Savage Beauty” or “China: Through the Looking Glass” can stay with me for years!

10. Describe someone outside your field of interest who inspires you and why?
Mahatma Gandhi, Kahlil Gibran – they make us think.
Lucille Ball, Carol Burnett, Cary Grant – they make us laugh.
Alexander McQueen, Mark Rothko, Walt Disney – they make us dream.

11. You are a seasoned traveler. Where have you not been that you would like to visit?
The farthest cliffs of Nepal.

12. Who would play you in your feature film biopic?
If I could go back in time, I’d choose Gregory Peck. Or Gary Cooper!

13. If you were given the opportunity to create a reality-type design TV show, what would it look like?
One where the designer would help people find their own, completely unique design style. A more soulful approach to design.